Skip to content

Genesis Developer Docs

Genesis Configuration

Requires Genesis 2.8.0+

The Genesis configuration API lets Genesis child theme developers do two things:

  1. Override certain Genesis parent theme settings.
  2. Load configuration data from the child theme's config folder.

To use these features, create the config folder in the root of your child theme (at the same level as style.css) if it does not exist already.

Override Genesis features

The following config files from the Genesis parent theme can be overridden by placing a file of the same name in your child theme's config folder.

You can copy the code in these files to your child theme, then make desired changes.

For example, to alter the layouts your child theme offers so that it only includes a “full-width” and “content-sidebar” layout instead of the six layouts Genesis offers by default, you can create a file at your-child-theme/config/layouts.php with the following content:

<?php
/**
* Your Theme Name
*
* Overrides `genesis/config/layouts.php` to set default theme layouts.
*
* @package Theme Name
* @author Your Name
* @license GPL-2.0-or-later
* @link https://example.com/
*/


// Path to layout images in the Genesis parent theme.
$url = GENESIS_ADMIN_IMAGES_URL . '/layouts/';

return array(
'content-sidebar' => array(
'label' => __( 'Content, Primary Sidebar', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'img' => $url . 'cs.gif',
'default' => is_rtl() ? false : true,
'type' => array( 'site' ),
),
'full-width-content' => array(
'label' => __( 'Full Width Content', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'img' => $url . 'c.gif',
'type' => array( 'site' ),
),
);

Another approach is to use the child theme config files to load parent theme config, then add and unset default values instead of reproducing the parent config file contents explicitly. For example, the same result above can be achieved with a your-child-theme/config/layouts.php file that looks like this:

<?php
/**
* Your Theme Name
*
* Overrides `genesis/config/layouts.php` to set default theme layouts.
*
* @package Theme Name
* @author Your Name
* @license GPL-2.0-or-later
* @link https://example.com/
*/


$layouts = array();

$genesis_layouts_config = get_template_directory() . '/config/layouts.php';

if ( is_readable( $genesis_layouts_config ) ) {
$layouts = require $genesis_layouts_config;
unset( $layouts['sidebar-content'] );
unset( $layouts['content-sidebar-sidebar'] );
unset( $layouts['sidebar-sidebar-content'] );
unset( $layouts['sidebar-content-sidebar'] );
}

return $layouts;

Load child theme settings from your theme's config folder

Genesis 2.8.0+ includes a genesis_get_config() function. This allows you to fetch custom configuration data from your child theme's config folder.

Child themes contain PHP configuration data — the data that makes your theme different to other themes — that is scattered across PHP files. Your functions.php file might include code that looks like this, for example:

add_theme_support(
'custom-logo',
array(
'height' => 120,
'width' => 700,
'flex-height' => true,
'flex-width' => true,
)
);

And you may have a separate file that sets up WordPress block editor features, such as custom font sizes:

add_theme_support(
'editor-font-sizes',
array(
array(
'name' => __( 'Small', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'shortName' => __( 'S', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'size' => 12,
'slug' => 'small',
),
array(
'name' => __( 'Normal', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'shortName' => __( 'M', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'size' => 16,
'slug' => 'normal',
),
array(
'name' => __( 'Large', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'shortName' => __( 'L', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'size' => 20,
'slug' => 'large',
),
array(
'name' => __( 'Larger', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'shortName' => __( 'XL', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'size' => 24,
'slug' => 'larger',
),
)
);

With genesis_get_config(), you can instead write code like this:

add_theme_support( 'custom-logo', genesis_get_config( 'custom-logo' ) );

With a file at your-theme-name/config/custom-logo.php that looks like this:

return array(
'height' => 120,
'width' => 700,
'flex-height' => true,
'flex-width' => true,
);

The editor-font-sizes theme support becomes:

add_theme_support( 'editor-font-sizes', genesis_get_config( 'editor-font-sizes' ) );

With a file at your-theme-name/config/editor-font-sizes.php that looks like this:

return array(
array(
'name' => __( 'Small', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'shortName' => __( 'S', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'size' => 12,
'slug' => 'small',
),
array(
'name' => __( 'Normal', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'shortName' => __( 'M', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'size' => 16,
'slug' => 'normal',
),
array(
'name' => __( 'Large', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'shortName' => __( 'L', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'size' => 20,
'slug' => 'large',
),
array(
'name' => __( 'Larger', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'shortName' => __( 'XL', 'your-theme-slug' ),
'size' => 24,
'slug' => 'larger',
),
);

Moving your configuration data to the config folder in this way is optional. You can use it for all PHP data in your theme, for select data, or not at all. The advantages of this approach are:

The parent theme config file names are reserved for use by Genesis. You should not name a config file breadcrumbs.php, for example, unless you intend to override Genesis breadcrumbs configuration.